Current studies, corroborated analyses, efficient safety concepts and concrete approaches to solutions for more safety in Austria - this is what you will found in our new publication series "KFV - Living Safely."

 

#1 - 100-Car Study Austria

Naturalistic observation of driving behavior is a relatively young discipline in road safety research. Using this method, the behavior of road users can be observed under authentic, real-life conditions

Study in PDF

 

#2 - Basic Driver Education for Category B: Effectiveness and Potential for Improvement

The Austrian Road Safety Board (KFV) recently completed a study of the effectiveness of current basic driver education for category B driving licenses in Austria. The study was carreid out using the Goals for Drivier Education (GDE) matrix, which is recognized across Europe. In addition to didactic and pedagogic concepts, the study analyzed the methods and practices used and derived a number of practical suggestions for improving driver education at this level.

Study in PDF

 

#3 - Strategic Topics for European Road Safety Policy 2016-2020

26,313 people were killed on Europe's roads in 2015. Thus, despite the achievement of the past, there is still need for action to reduce the number of people killed or injured in road traffic. Road safety will therefore certainly continue to be a part of the political agenda of the EU and its Member States. However, the topics and activities in road safety policy that will determine the next few zears are less apparent. Official programs usually provide an insight only on a very general level. For this reason, the Austrian Road Safety (KFV) has asked the Erfurt University of Applied Sciences in Germany to carry out an extensive policy analysis in order to enable KFV to forecast the topics and measures in EU policy for the period 2016-2020.

Study in PDF

 

#4 - Causes of Motorcycle Accidents

There are a number of reasons for taking a particularly close look at the causes of motorcycle accidents: in Austria, accident rates of motorcycles are far higher than those of other car classifications, the number of registered motorcycles has been growin much faster than that of other vehicles for many years, yet there is still a lack of promising measures to counter the growing number of accidents.

Study in PDF

 

#5 - Aggression in Traffic

This study looks at the phenomenon of aggression on the roads from the psychological, social sciences
and legal perspectives. The goal of the psychological and social sciences part of the study (1) is to identify the prevalence and genesis of aggressive behavior on Austria’s roads as well as its relevance from a road accident perspective. The link between the aggressive behavior of other road users and emotional stress, which often causes frustration and an aggressive reaction, was already identified in the 1939 Frustration-Aggression Hypothesis. The definition of aggression on the roads proposed by Herzberg and Schlag (2006), which includes both openly hostile behaviour like swearing, honking, making threats, etc. as well as instrumental behavior (e.g. tailgating to get to a destination more quickly), serves as the basis for the present study.

Study in PDF

 

#6 - Distraction in Traffic

Distraction and lack of due care and attention are the most frequent – and continually rising – causes of road accidents in Austria. Together, distraction and lack of due care and attention are the main cause of 33.3 % of all road accidents in which people are injured and 24.1 % of all road accident fatalities. Distraction and lack of due care and attention affect all road users. To study distraction in detail and identify measures to counter the underestimated risks, the KFV experts have looked at this topic in depth and studied all forms of road use in this regard.

Study in PDF

 

#7 - The impact of distraction on driving behaviour in urban traffic

Distraction in traffic is a growing problem. In Austria, distraction, together with inattention, is responsible for one third of all injury accidents. On an international level, it is estimated that distraction contributes to 5% to 25% of all traffic accidents. For this reason, the Austrian Road Safety Board (KFV) has dealt extensively with the topic of distraction while driving. Surveys, expert assessments and Naturalistic Driving Observations have been used to identify the main sources of distraction (in terms of frequency, duration, use of cognitive, visual, auditive and manual resources) for Austrian car drivers. These were identified as: (1) phoning, (2) texting, and (3) eating and drinking.

 

Study in PDF